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AN070 Homeopathic Infection Clear (30ml) - Infection, fever, inflammations anywhere in the body. Including egg yolk peritonitis in Birds.

Code: AN070 30ml

39 reviews
  • Infection, fever, inflammations anywhere in the body.
  • A stronger antibiotic HAMPL Infection Fighter 71 (herbal)
  • Enterobacter, Serratia, Klebsilla, Shigella, Proteus, Pseudomonas
  • Staphylococcus, Strep, Listeria, E.Coli, Pasteurella Multocida
  • Egg Yolk Peritonitis in hens as well.
Set of 1
HAMPL Infection Clear 70 30ml (1oz) *Homeopathic Antibiotic
  • Infection, fever, inflammations anywhere in the body.
  • A stronger antibiotic HAMPL Infection Fighter 71 (herbal)
  • Enterobacter, Serratia, Klebsilla, Shigella, Proteus, Pseudomonas
  • Staphylococcus, Strep, Listeria, E.Coli, Pasteurella Multocida
  • Egg Yolk Peritonitis in hens as well.
Set of 1
HAMPL Infection Clear 70 30ml (1oz) *Homeopathic Antibiotic

Help Sheet

  • HOMEOPATHIC ANTIBIOTIC 

    for Infections cause fever and pain, and it can appear anywhere on the body.  

    This formula is excellent to maintain optimum health from infections as well as clear them.
    Example:  Bacterial strains like Enterobacter, Serratia, Pasteurella Multocida, Klebsiella, Clostridium Perfringens, Shigella, Proteus and Babesia infection (a parasite that affected red blood cells) and Nocardia Bacteria  (which is called Nocardiosis that could affect various parts of the body e.g.  Lungs,  sinus,  skin,  kidneys and brain.

    The very need and importance of supporting the animals natural defense force throughout the body are by boosting WBC (White Blood cells).

    A MORE POTENT DIFFERENT FORM OF ANTIBIOTIC

    Or  if needing a more potent "Antibiotic" that is natural In case this homeopathic formula does not 100% clear infection within 3 days, then consider also using in conjunction the HERBAL ANTIBIOTIC  HAMPL Infection Fighter 71 liquid.  The herbal antibiotic is a more potent formula.


    What are Egg Yolk Peritonitis? Egg yolk peritonitis is a very serious condition. It is the most common fatal obstetrical condition in birds. Egg yolk peritonitis can occur in any bird species, but it is most common in cockatiels, budgerigars, lovebirds, ducks and macaws. If your bird is showing symptoms of egg yolk peritonitis she should be seen by an avian veterinarian as soon as possible. The symptoms of egg yolk peritonitis are similar to that of egg binding. The early detection, diagnosis and treatment of this condition may save your bird’s life. During ovulation, a mature ova (yolk) is released from the hen’s ovary into the oviduct. When the yolk does not enter the oviduct and instead enters the abdominal cavity, it causes inflammation to the membrane lining (peritoneum) of the abdomen. This condition is referred to as egg yolk peritonitis. Symptoms of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Symptoms of non-septic and septic egg peritonitis may include: Abdominal and vent swelling Weight loss Wide based stance Depression Weakness Lethargy Ascites (accumulation of fluids in the abdominal cavity) Respiratory distress Anorexia Yolk colored droppings Fluffed feathers Lack of vocalization Pain Change in regular behavior Secondary - Abdominal hernia due to extreme abnormal distention Sudden death Types Non-septic egg peritonitis - No bacteria is present Septic egg peritonitis (most common) - Contaminated with bacteria, typically E.coli Causes of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Egg yolk peritonitis may be caused by: Ruptured oviduct Reverse peristalsis Bird was restrained or stressed during ovulation Genetic

    Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/bird/condition/egg-yolk-peritonitis

    What are Egg Yolk Peritonitis?

    Egg yolk peritonitis is a very serious condition.

    It is the most common fatal obstetrical condition in birds. Egg yolk peritonitis can occur in any bird species, but it is most common in cockatiels, budgerigars, lovebirds, ducks and macaws. If your bird is showing symptoms of egg yolk peritonitis she should be seen by an avian veterinarian as soon as possible. The symptoms of egg yolk peritonitis are similar to that of egg binding. The early detection, diagnosis and treatment of this condition may save your bird’s life. During ovulation, a mature ova (yolk) is released from the hen’s ovary into the oviduct. When the yolk does not enter the oviduct and instead enters the abdominal cavity, it causes inflammation to the membrane lining (peritoneum) of the abdomen. This condition is referred to as egg yolk peritonitis.

    Symptoms of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds

    Symptoms of non-septic and septic egg peritonitis may include:

    Abdominal and vent swelling

    Weight loss

    Wide based stance

    Depression

    Weakness

    Lethargy

    Ascites (accumulation of fluids in the abdominal cavity)

    Respiratory distress

    Anorexia

    Yolk colored droppings

    Fluffed feathers

    Lack of vocalization

    Pain

    Change in regular behavior Secondary - Abdominal hernia due to extreme abnormal distention

    Sudden death

    Type

    • Non-septic egg peritonitis -   No bacteria is present Septic egg peritonitis (most common) -    Contaminated with bacteria, typically E.coli


      Causes of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Egg yolk peritonitis may be caused by:
    • Ruptured oviduct
    • Reverse peristalsis
    • Bird was restrained or stressed during ovulation
    • Genetic

      Reference: https://wagwalking.com/bird/condition/egg-yolk-peritonitis

     

     

    What are Egg Yolk Peritonitis? Egg yolk peritonitis is a very serious condition. It is the most common fatal obstetrical condition in birds. Egg yolk peritonitis can occur in any bird species, but it is most common in cockatiels, budgerigars, lovebirds, ducks and macaws. If your bird is showing symptoms of egg yolk peritonitis she should be seen by an avian veterinarian as soon as possible. The symptoms of egg yolk peritonitis are similar to that of egg binding. The early detection, diagnosis and treatment of this condition may save your bird’s life. During ovulation, a mature ova (yolk) is released from the hen’s ovary into the oviduct. When the yolk does not enter the oviduct and instead enters the abdominal cavity, it causes inflammation to the membrane lining (peritoneum) of the abdomen. This condition is referred to as egg yolk peritonitis. Symptoms of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Symptoms of non-septic and septic egg peritonitis may include: Abdominal and vent swelling Weight loss Wide based stance Depression Weakness Lethargy Ascites (accumulation of fluids in the abdominal cavity) Respiratory distress Anorexia Yolk colored droppings Fluffed feathers Lack of vocalization Pain Change in regular behavior Secondary - Abdominal hernia due to extreme abnormal distention Sudden death Types Non-septic egg peritonitis - No bacteria is present Septic egg peritonitis (most common) - Contaminated with bacteria, typically E.coli Causes of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Egg yolk peritonitis may be caused by: Ruptured oviduct Reverse peristalsis Bird was restrained or stressed during ovulation Genetic

    Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/bird/condition/egg-yolk-peritonitis
    Diagnosis of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds During the consultation, let the veterinarian know what symptoms you have observed in your bird and when they started. If your bird has been seen by another veterinarian, it is recommended that you bring the previous medical records as this will help with the evaluation of your bird’s medical history. The veterinarian will then perform a physical exam and may suggest administering a small amount of gas anesthesia to the patient before starting; this gas anesthetic may help your bird to be less stressed. Weighing your bird, checking his eyes, beak, oral cavity, and plumage will be next, in addition to an abdominal palpation, vent and cloacal examination. The veterinarian may want to run some diagnostic tests. Patients with egg yolk peritonitis may have a higher white blood cell count (leukocytosis) and an increase in blood calcium, cholesterol and blood protein. An abdominal tap may reveal yolk or fat globules. The veterinarian may want to have a culture of the aspirated fluid.

    Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/bird/condition/egg-yolk-peritonitis
    Diagnosis of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds During the consultation, let the veterinarian know what symptoms you have observed in your bird and when they started. If your bird has been seen by another veterinarian, it is recommended that you bring the previous medical records as this will help with the evaluation of your bird’s medical history. The veterinarian will then perform a physical exam and may suggest administering a small amount of gas anesthesia to the patient before starting; this gas anesthetic may help your bird to be less stressed. Weighing your bird, checking his eyes, beak, oral cavity, and plumage will be next, in addition to an abdominal palpation, vent and cloacal examination. The veterinarian may want to run some diagnostic tests. Patients with egg yolk peritonitis may have a higher white blood cell count (leukocytosis) and an increase in blood calcium, cholesterol and blood protein. An abdominal tap may reveal yolk or fat globules. The veterinarian may want to have a culture of the aspirated fluid.

    Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/bird/condition/egg-yolk-peritonitis
    Diagnosis of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds During the consultation, let the veterinarian know what symptoms you have observed in your bird and when they started. If your bird has been seen by another veterinarian, it is recommended that you bring the previous medical records as this will help with the evaluation of your bird’s medical history. The veterinarian will then perform a physical exam and may suggest administering a small amount of gas anesthesia to the patient before starting; this gas anesthetic may help your bird to be less stressed. Weighing your bird, checking his eyes, beak, oral cavity, and plumage will be next, in addition to an abdominal palpation, vent and cloacal examination. The veterinarian may want to run some diagnostic tests. Patients with egg yolk peritonitis may have a higher white blood cell count (leukocytosis) and an increase in blood calcium, cholesterol and blood protein. An abdominal tap may reveal yolk or fat globules. The veterinarian may want to have a culture of the aspirated fluid.

    Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/bird/condition/egg-yolk-peritonitis
    Diagnosis of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds During the consultation, let the veterinarian know what symptoms you have observed in your bird and when they started. If your bird has been seen by another veterinarian, it is recommended that you bring the previous medical records as this will help with the evaluation of your bird’s medical history. The veterinarian will then perform a physical exam and may suggest administering a small amount of gas anesthesia to the patient before starting; this gas anesthetic may help your bird to be less stressed. Weighing your bird, checking his eyes, beak, oral cavity, and plumage will be next, in addition to an abdominal palpation, vent and cloacal examination. The veterinarian may want to run some diagnostic tests. Patients with egg yolk peritonitis may have a higher white blood cell count (leukocytosis) and an increase in blood calcium, cholesterol and blood protein. An abdominal tap may reveal yolk or fat globules. The veterinarian may want to have a culture of the aspirated fluid.

    Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/bird/condition/egg-yolk-peritonitis
    What are Egg Yolk Peritonitis? Egg yolk peritonitis is a very serious condition. It is the most common fatal obstetrical condition in birds. Egg yolk peritonitis can occur in any bird species, but it is most common in cockatiels, budgerigars, lovebirds, ducks and macaws. If your bird is showing symptoms of egg yolk peritonitis she should be seen by an avian veterinarian as soon as possible. The symptoms of egg yolk peritonitis are similar to that of egg binding. The early detection, diagnosis and treatment of this condition may save your bird’s life. During ovulation, a mature ova (yolk) is released from the hen’s ovary into the oviduct. When the yolk does not enter the oviduct and instead enters the abdominal cavity, it causes inflammation to the membrane lining (peritoneum) of the abdomen. This condition is referred to as egg yolk peritonitis. Symptoms of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Symptoms of non-septic and septic egg peritonitis may include: Abdominal and vent swelling Weight loss Wide based stance Depression Weakness Lethargy Ascites (accumulation of fluids in the abdominal cavity) Respiratory distress Anorexia Yolk colored droppings Fluffed feathers Lack of vocalization Pain Change in regular behavior Secondary - Abdominal hernia due to extreme abnormal distention Sudden death Types Non-septic egg peritonitis - No bacteria is present Septic egg peritonitis (most common) - Contaminated with bacteria, typically E.coli Causes of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Egg yolk peritonitis may be caused by: Ruptured oviduct Reverse peristalsis Bird was restrained or stressed during ovulation Genetic Diagnosis of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds During the consultation, let the veterinarian know what symptoms you have observed in your bird and when they started. If your bird has been seen by another veterinarian, it is recommended that you bring the previous medical records as this will help with the evaluation of your bird’s medical history. The veterinarian will then perform a physical exam and may suggest administering a small amount of gas anesthesia to the patient before starting; this gas anesthetic may help your bird to be less stressed. Weighing your bird, checking his eyes, beak, oral cavity, and plumage will be next, in addition to an abdominal palpation, vent and cloacal examination. The veterinarian may want to run some diagnostic tests. Patients with egg yolk peritonitis may have a higher white blood cell count (leukocytosis) and an increase in blood calcium, cholesterol and blood protein. An abdominal tap may reveal yolk or fat globules. The veterinarian may want to have a culture of the aspirated fluid.

    Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/bird/condition/egg-yolk-peritonitis
    What are Egg Yolk Peritonitis? Egg yolk peritonitis is a very serious condition. It is the most common fatal obstetrical condition in birds. Egg yolk peritonitis can occur in any bird species, but it is most common in cockatiels, budgerigars, lovebirds, ducks and macaws. If your bird is showing symptoms of egg yolk peritonitis she should be seen by an avian veterinarian as soon as possible. The symptoms of egg yolk peritonitis are similar to that of egg binding. The early detection, diagnosis and treatment of this condition may save your bird’s life. During ovulation, a mature ova (yolk) is released from the hen’s ovary into the oviduct. When the yolk does not enter the oviduct and instead enters the abdominal cavity, it causes inflammation to the membrane lining (peritoneum) of the abdomen. This condition is referred to as egg yolk peritonitis. Symptoms of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Symptoms of non-septic and septic egg peritonitis may include: Abdominal and vent swelling Weight loss Wide based stance Depression Weakness Lethargy Ascites (accumulation of fluids in the abdominal cavity) Respiratory distress Anorexia Yolk colored droppings Fluffed feathers Lack of vocalization Pain Change in regular behavior Secondary - Abdominal hernia due to extreme abnormal distention Sudden death Types Non-septic egg peritonitis - No bacteria is present Septic egg peritonitis (most common) - Contaminated with bacteria, typically E.coli Causes of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Egg yolk peritonitis may be caused by: Ruptured oviduct Reverse peristalsis Bird was restrained or stressed during ovulation Genetic Diagnosis of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds During the consultation, let the veterinarian know what symptoms you have observed in your bird and when they started. If your bird has been seen by another veterinarian, it is recommended that you bring the previous medical records as this will help with the evaluation of your bird’s medical history. The veterinarian will then perform a physical exam and may suggest administering a small amount of gas anesthesia to the patient before starting; this gas anesthetic may help your bird to be less stressed. Weighing your bird, checking his eyes, beak, oral cavity, and plumage will be next, in addition to an abdominal palpation, vent and cloacal examination. The veterinarian may want to run some diagnostic tests. Patients with egg yolk peritonitis may have a higher white blood cell count (leukocytosis) and an increase in blood calcium, cholesterol and blood protein. An abdominal tap may reveal yolk or fat globules. The veterinarian may want to have a culture of the aspirated fluid.

    Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/bird/condition/egg-yolk-peritonitis
    What are Egg Yolk Peritonitis? Egg yolk peritonitis is a very serious condition. It is the most common fatal obstetrical condition in birds. Egg yolk peritonitis can occur in any bird species, but it is most common in cockatiels, budgerigars, lovebirds, ducks and macaws. If your bird is showing symptoms of egg yolk peritonitis she should be seen by an avian veterinarian as soon as possible. The symptoms of egg yolk peritonitis are similar to that of egg binding. The early detection, diagnosis and treatment of this condition may save your bird’s life. During ovulation, a mature ova (yolk) is released from the hen’s ovary into the oviduct. When the yolk does not enter the oviduct and instead enters the abdominal cavity, it causes inflammation to the membrane lining (peritoneum) of the abdomen. This condition is referred to as egg yolk peritonitis. Symptoms of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Symptoms of non-septic and septic egg peritonitis may include: Abdominal and vent swelling Weight loss Wide based stance Depression Weakness Lethargy Ascites (accumulation of fluids in the abdominal cavity) Respiratory distress Anorexia Yolk colored droppings Fluffed feathers Lack of vocalization Pain Change in regular behavior Secondary - Abdominal hernia due to extreme abnormal distention Sudden death Types Non-septic egg peritonitis - No bacteria is present Septic egg peritonitis (most common) - Contaminated with bacteria, typically E.coli Causes of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Egg yolk peritonitis may be caused by: Ruptured oviduct Reverse peristalsis Bird was restrained or stressed during ovulation Genetic Diagnosis of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds During the consultation, let the veterinarian know what symptoms you have observed in your bird and when they started. If your bird has been seen by another veterinarian, it is recommended that you bring the previous medical records as this will help with the evaluation of your bird’s medical history. The veterinarian will then perform a physical exam and may suggest administering a small amount of gas anesthesia to the patient before starting; this gas anesthetic may help your bird to be less stressed. Weighing your bird, checking his eyes, beak, oral cavity, and plumage will be next, in addition to an abdominal palpation, vent and cloacal examination. The veterinarian may want to run some diagnostic tests. Patients with egg yolk peritonitis may have a higher white blood cell count (leukocytosis) and an increase in blood calcium, cholesterol and blood protein. An abdominal tap may reveal yolk or fat globules. The veterinarian may want to have a culture of the aspirated fluid. Treatment of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Birds with non-septic egg yolk peritonitis will be treated with fluid injections and antibiotics may be administered as a preventative for bacterial infections. Patients with ascitic fluid may need to have an abdominocentesis to have all the fluid removed. The veterinarian will use a needle to withdraw the yolk fluid. Patients with septic-egg yolk peritonitis will need to be stabilized. The veterinarian may suggest that the patient be hospitalized in order for her to receive 24/7 intensive care. The patient will be given fluids to keep her hydrated, long-term antibiotic treatment, and will be kept warm in a stress-free environment. If the bird is not eating she may have to be tube fed; it is important that the patient is on a high protein diet. Once the bird is stable and stronger she will need to undergo surgery to flush out the abdominal cavity. The veterinarian may also suggest performing a salpingectomy; which is removal of the ovaries. The procedure would prevent future egg yolk peritonitis recurring. Recovery of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Patients diagnosed and treated for non-septic egg peritonitis have a good recovery prognosis. Follow up visits will be necessary to monitor the patient’s progress. The veterinarian may want to have bloodwork retaken to ensure that the patient’s blood levels are all within the normal range. The veterinarian may recommend hormonal injections to prevent the bird from ovulating. If your bird underwent surgery, you will be given post-up instructions from the surgeon. Follow-up visits will be necessary to check on her progress and to remove the sutures. It is important to follow the post-op instructions and to make sure that the bird is eating and drinking water. Egg Yolk Peritonitis Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals Hazel chicken 13 Months Moderate condition 0 found helpful Has Symptoms Lethargy Lethargic My chicken laid a soft egg yesterday I noticed a drip of egg white on her feathers I took her to vets they said nothing is there inside her and that she is healthy now she is acting very tired she is eating and drinking she has got a bit of soft poop 1 year, 6 months ago Hazel's Owner Dr. Callum Turner, DVM Dr. Callum Turner, DVM 3320 Recommendations It is difficult to say what the specific cause of the lethargy is and whether the cause is related to the laying of the soft egg or if there is a wider health issue with Hazel; nutritional deficiencies including lack of calcium etc… in the diet may be responsible. However if Hazel isn’t improving you may want to think about returning to your Veterinarian since the lethargy has just presented. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM 1 year, 6 months ago Hazel is a lot better now scratching and pecking about again but not laid for a week 1 year, 6 months ago Hazel's Owner Hi she get vermex layer pellets and grit plus scratch feeds like corn and greens like spinach and cabbage 1 year, 6 months ago Hazel's Owner Add a comment to Hazel's experience Was this experience helpful? Ducky Khaki Camp 12 Months Serious condition 0 found helpful Has Symptoms Not Eating Lathargic Medication Used none I have a khaki Campbell female duck who had no problem laying eggs for the 1st several months. Then I noticed she stopped laying but everything was saying that if she was egg bound she couldn't poop, but she was pooping. Well she hadn't been getting better so I finally soaked are in a tub massaged her abdomen and she was egg bound! By the time I got the egg out of her she was pouring clear mucus out of her vent and the egg was soft but the size of a goose egg, it had 16 layers of shell and a tail like it was going up the over duct. It has been over a week she has still been acting weird not really eating she does drink she's pooping black stuff or green acts very lethargic and just lays around the yard all day I have not seen her swim in the pool yet in probably a month. So I am wondering if at this point it's to late and she has an infection and if I should just Euthanize her? 1 year, 6 months ago Ducky's Owner Dr. Callum Turner, DVM Dr. Callum Turner, DVM 3320 Recommendations Some egg bound birds can still pass droppings, so it is a possible symptom but not definitive; it is possible that Ducky has secondary egg yolk peritonitis especially if standing like a penguin or there is distention. You should see if there is any improvement but if there is egg yolk peritonitis a visit to a Veterinarian would be recommended. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM 1 year, 6 months ago Add a comment to Ducky's experience Was this experience helpful? Fauna buckeye chicken 2 Years Moderate condition 0 found helpful Has Symptoms Lethargy Swollen lower abdomen, sitting ofte Treatment for Egg Peritontis. We had our 2 1/2 yr Buckeye Hen xrayed yesterday and the vet diagnoised her with EYP. She stated that there was little to nothing to be done for treatment. She did mention surgry as the other option but that it doesnt have favorable outcomes. My wife and I left devistated but began to research treatment options. I have read many sucsses stories of folks who have provided treatment. One method was administering calcium glutamte injecctions (we have done this in the past for our other hen with hypocalcimia) and antibiotics baytril 100. Is this a safe option? she has fluid collecting in her lower abdomen i would call it moderately swollen. 1 year, 8 months ago Fauna's Owner Dr. Callum Turner, DVM Dr. Callum Turner, DVM 3320 Recommendations If treated early with antibiotics, the prognosis may be more favourable but it is still generally concerned that there is no treatment or ineffective treatment for egg yolk peritonitis; surgery is an option but many times it is more humane to put to sleep. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM 1 year, 8 months ago Add a comment to Fauna's experience Was this experience helpful? Betsy Rhode Island red 18 Months Moderate condition 0 found helpful Has Symptoms Leaky bum, reserved, fluffed up My hen suddenly started leaking liquid from her bum. A white discharge but also sometimes clear and gloopy. It’s constant. She was fine all day acting normal the weather has been kind of warm. She is an ex battery hen that I got two months ago in a bit of state but has been laying fine. This started this in the last few hours. She has eaten layers pellets, corn scrambled eggs and some melon. Water has cider vinegar in it. 1 year, 9 months ago Betsy's Owner Dr. Callum Turner, DVM Dr. Callum Turner, DVM 3320 Recommendations It is great ex battery hens are getting a new life after leaving the laying house! However, there are a few possible causes which it may be including a fungal infection; without examining Betsy I cannot prescribe anything for her. Try to collect some of the material and take it to be examined by your Veterinarian so that a diagnosis may be made and treatment given. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM 1 year, 9 months ago Add a comment to Betsy's experience Was this experience helpful? Elvis ameraucana 3 Years Serious condition 0 found helpful Has Symptoms yolk in poo, stopped laying Hello, I found some yolk in my hen's poo 4 nights ago and she hasn't laid since. She's acting normal except seems like she may be struggling to poo (little bits at a time instead of all at once). Please help, she's one of our favorite lapbirds! Sincerely, Laura Hessel 1 year, 10 months ago Elvis's Owner Dr. Michele King, DVM Dr. Michele King, DVM 1611 Recommendations Birds can become egg-bound, or have other internal problems that need to be treated. Without seeing Elvis, I'm not sure what might be going on with her, but it would be best to have her seen by a veterinarian that sees birds, as they will be able to examine her and take an x-ray if needed, to determine what is happening with her. I hope that all goes well for her. 1 year, 10 months ago Add a comment to Elvis's experience Was this experience helpful? Veterinarian with bird Have a story about Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds? Win a FREE walk if Dog Catches Frisbee! CLICK TO THROW

    Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/bird/condition/egg-yolk-peritonitis
    What are Egg Yolk Peritonitis? Egg yolk peritonitis is a very serious condition. It is the most common fatal obstetrical condition in birds. Egg yolk peritonitis can occur in any bird species, but it is most common in cockatiels, budgerigars, lovebirds, ducks and macaws. If your bird is showing symptoms of egg yolk peritonitis she should be seen by an avian veterinarian as soon as possible. The symptoms of egg yolk peritonitis are similar to that of egg binding. The early detection, diagnosis and treatment of this condition may save your bird’s life. During ovulation, a mature ova (yolk) is released from the hen’s ovary into the oviduct. When the yolk does not enter the oviduct and instead enters the abdominal cavity, it causes inflammation to the membrane lining (peritoneum) of the abdomen. This condition is referred to as egg yolk peritonitis. Symptoms of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Symptoms of non-septic and septic egg peritonitis may include: Abdominal and vent swelling Weight loss Wide based stance Depression Weakness Lethargy Ascites (accumulation of fluids in the abdominal cavity) Respiratory distress Anorexia Yolk colored droppings Fluffed feathers Lack of vocalization Pain Change in regular behavior Secondary - Abdominal hernia due to extreme abnormal distention Sudden death Types Non-septic egg peritonitis - No bacteria is present Septic egg peritonitis (most common) - Contaminated with bacteria, typically E.coli Causes of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Egg yolk peritonitis may be caused by: Ruptured oviduct Reverse peristalsis Bird was restrained or stressed during ovulation Genetic Diagnosis of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds During the consultation, let the veterinarian know what symptoms you have observed in your bird and when they started. If your bird has been seen by another veterinarian, it is recommended that you bring the previous medical records as this will help with the evaluation of your bird’s medical history. The veterinarian will then perform a physical exam and may suggest administering a small amount of gas anesthesia to the patient before starting; this gas anesthetic may help your bird to be less stressed. Weighing your bird, checking his eyes, beak, oral cavity, and plumage will be next, in addition to an abdominal palpation, vent and cloacal examination. The veterinarian may want to run some diagnostic tests. Patients with egg yolk peritonitis may have a higher white blood cell count (leukocytosis) and an increase in blood calcium, cholesterol and blood protein. An abdominal tap may reveal yolk or fat globules. The veterinarian may want to have a culture of the aspirated fluid. Treatment of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Birds with non-septic egg yolk peritonitis will be treated with fluid injections and antibiotics may be administered as a preventative for bacterial infections. Patients with ascitic fluid may need to have an abdominocentesis to have all the fluid removed. The veterinarian will use a needle to withdraw the yolk fluid. Patients with septic-egg yolk peritonitis will need to be stabilized. The veterinarian may suggest that the patient be hospitalized in order for her to receive 24/7 intensive care. The patient will be given fluids to keep her hydrated, long-term antibiotic treatment, and will be kept warm in a stress-free environment. If the bird is not eating she may have to be tube fed; it is important that the patient is on a high protein diet. Once the bird is stable and stronger she will need to undergo surgery to flush out the abdominal cavity. The veterinarian may also suggest performing a salpingectomy; which is removal of the ovaries. The procedure would prevent future egg yolk peritonitis recurring. Recovery of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds Patients diagnosed and treated for non-septic egg peritonitis have a good recovery prognosis. Follow up visits will be necessary to monitor the patient’s progress. The veterinarian may want to have bloodwork retaken to ensure that the patient’s blood levels are all within the normal range. The veterinarian may recommend hormonal injections to prevent the bird from ovulating. If your bird underwent surgery, you will be given post-up instructions from the surgeon. Follow-up visits will be necessary to check on her progress and to remove the sutures. It is important to follow the post-op instructions and to make sure that the bird is eating and drinking water. Egg Yolk Peritonitis Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals Hazel chicken 13 Months Moderate condition 0 found helpful Has Symptoms Lethargy Lethargic My chicken laid a soft egg yesterday I noticed a drip of egg white on her feathers I took her to vets they said nothing is there inside her and that she is healthy now she is acting very tired she is eating and drinking she has got a bit of soft poop 1 year, 6 months ago Hazel's Owner Dr. Callum Turner, DVM Dr. Callum Turner, DVM 3320 Recommendations It is difficult to say what the specific cause of the lethargy is and whether the cause is related to the laying of the soft egg or if there is a wider health issue with Hazel; nutritional deficiencies including lack of calcium etc… in the diet may be responsible. However if Hazel isn’t improving you may want to think about returning to your Veterinarian since the lethargy has just presented. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM 1 year, 6 months ago Hazel is a lot better now scratching and pecking about again but not laid for a week 1 year, 6 months ago Hazel's Owner Hi she get vermex layer pellets and grit plus scratch feeds like corn and greens like spinach and cabbage 1 year, 6 months ago Hazel's Owner Add a comment to Hazel's experience Was this experience helpful? Ducky Khaki Camp 12 Months Serious condition 0 found helpful Has Symptoms Not Eating Lathargic Medication Used none I have a khaki Campbell female duck who had no problem laying eggs for the 1st several months. Then I noticed she stopped laying but everything was saying that if she was egg bound she couldn't poop, but she was pooping. Well she hadn't been getting better so I finally soaked are in a tub massaged her abdomen and she was egg bound! By the time I got the egg out of her she was pouring clear mucus out of her vent and the egg was soft but the size of a goose egg, it had 16 layers of shell and a tail like it was going up the over duct. It has been over a week she has still been acting weird not really eating she does drink she's pooping black stuff or green acts very lethargic and just lays around the yard all day I have not seen her swim in the pool yet in probably a month. So I am wondering if at this point it's to late and she has an infection and if I should just Euthanize her? 1 year, 6 months ago Ducky's Owner Dr. Callum Turner, DVM Dr. Callum Turner, DVM 3320 Recommendations Some egg bound birds can still pass droppings, so it is a possible symptom but not definitive; it is possible that Ducky has secondary egg yolk peritonitis especially if standing like a penguin or there is distention. You should see if there is any improvement but if there is egg yolk peritonitis a visit to a Veterinarian would be recommended. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM 1 year, 6 months ago Add a comment to Ducky's experience Was this experience helpful? Fauna buckeye chicken 2 Years Moderate condition 0 found helpful Has Symptoms Lethargy Swollen lower abdomen, sitting ofte Treatment for Egg Peritontis. We had our 2 1/2 yr Buckeye Hen xrayed yesterday and the vet diagnoised her with EYP. She stated that there was little to nothing to be done for treatment. She did mention surgry as the other option but that it doesnt have favorable outcomes. My wife and I left devistated but began to research treatment options. I have read many sucsses stories of folks who have provided treatment. One method was administering calcium glutamte injecctions (we have done this in the past for our other hen with hypocalcimia) and antibiotics baytril 100. Is this a safe option? she has fluid collecting in her lower abdomen i would call it moderately swollen. 1 year, 8 months ago Fauna's Owner Dr. Callum Turner, DVM Dr. Callum Turner, DVM 3320 Recommendations If treated early with antibiotics, the prognosis may be more favourable but it is still generally concerned that there is no treatment or ineffective treatment for egg yolk peritonitis; surgery is an option but many times it is more humane to put to sleep. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM 1 year, 8 months ago Add a comment to Fauna's experience Was this experience helpful? Betsy Rhode Island red 18 Months Moderate condition 0 found helpful Has Symptoms Leaky bum, reserved, fluffed up My hen suddenly started leaking liquid from her bum. A white discharge but also sometimes clear and gloopy. It’s constant. She was fine all day acting normal the weather has been kind of warm. She is an ex battery hen that I got two months ago in a bit of state but has been laying fine. This started this in the last few hours. She has eaten layers pellets, corn scrambled eggs and some melon. Water has cider vinegar in it. 1 year, 9 months ago Betsy's Owner Dr. Callum Turner, DVM Dr. Callum Turner, DVM 3320 Recommendations It is great ex battery hens are getting a new life after leaving the laying house! However, there are a few possible causes which it may be including a fungal infection; without examining Betsy I cannot prescribe anything for her. Try to collect some of the material and take it to be examined by your Veterinarian so that a diagnosis may be made and treatment given. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM 1 year, 9 months ago Add a comment to Betsy's experience Was this experience helpful? Elvis ameraucana 3 Years Serious condition 0 found helpful Has Symptoms yolk in poo, stopped laying Hello, I found some yolk in my hen's poo 4 nights ago and she hasn't laid since. She's acting normal except seems like she may be struggling to poo (little bits at a time instead of all at once). Please help, she's one of our favorite lapbirds! Sincerely, Laura Hessel 1 year, 10 months ago Elvis's Owner Dr. Michele King, DVM Dr. Michele King, DVM 1611 Recommendations Birds can become egg-bound, or have other internal problems that need to be treated. Without seeing Elvis, I'm not sure what might be going on with her, but it would be best to have her seen by a veterinarian that sees birds, as they will be able to examine her and take an x-ray if needed, to determine what is happening with her. I hope that all goes well for her. 1 year, 10 months ago Add a comment to Elvis's experience Was this experience helpful? Veterinarian with bird Have a story about Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds? Win a FREE walk if Dog Catches Frisbee! CLICK TO THROW

    Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/bird/condition/egg-yolk-peritonitis
  • Non-Drug Prescription  "HOMEOPATHIC ANTIBIOTIC"  for fever, infection, inflammations for ALL Species & Ages

    HAMPL Infection Clear 70  30ml (1oz) drops   *an all-around Infection formula, can use as a prevention as well.
    Contains homeopathic, nosode complex: Pasteurella Multiocida, Pasteurella Pestis, Pasteurella Pseudotuberculosis, Pasteurella tularensis 12X, 200CPenicillium Nosode, Pyogenicum, Pasteurella Multocida nosode 12X, 30X,10M, Staphylococcus Aur Bacteria nosode and Streptococcus bacteria Nosode 1M, Listeria nosode 30C, 200C, Gunpowder nosode, Cortisone, Echinacea 200C, Kali Phos, Babesia Gibsoni nosode 30X (parasitic infection), Belladonna, (NAR) Fever balance 200C, Crotalus Horr 200C, Salmonella nosode 12X,1M, Shigella nosode 10M, 6X, Klebsiella pneumonia nosode 200C,10M, Enterobacter Cloacae Bacteria nosode 4X, 1M, 10M, Serratia mac nosode 12C, Proteus nosode 12C,10M, Escherichia coli (E.coli) nosode 6X,10M, Enterococinum nosode 12X,10M, Hydrastis 3X,10M, Aconite 200X,10M (acute sudden fever, shock), Belladonna 200X,10M (fever), Gunpowder nosode 10M,CM (holds infection to stop spreading), Echinacea 3X,1M, 10M, Pseudomonas Aer Bacteria nosode 10M, Pseudomonas Mallei Bacteria nosode 1M, Anthracinum nosode 12C, Septiceminum nosode 1M,10M, Nocardia Bacteria nosode 4X, 12C, 30C, 10M, Bartonella Henselae Bacteria nosode 30X (cat scratch fever)Babesia Microti nosode 30X, Babesia gibsoni nosode 30X with Clostridium Perfringens nosode 30X, 200C,10M (diarrhea or hemorrhagic diarrhea), Clostridium difficile 30X, 200C, 10M (also called C. difficile) (are bacteria that can cause swelling and irritation of the large intestine, or colon. This inflammation, known as colitis, can cause diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps), Valley fever nosode 30C (coccidiosis immitis) fungal infection prevention, Antibiotic Drug Detox 30C, 200C (will help to resolve yeast infections too) 

    * Easy homeopathic application to all species and ages.  Apply drops to the body, in meals and water dish.
    For more serious "systemic symptoms"  e.g.  sinusitis, pneumonia and brain abscess or mouth or body abscess etc, use the HAMPL Infection Fighter 71 50ml(herbal antibiotic) and HAMPL DrawingOut 16 30ml formula


    Example
    :  we have also Include the homeopathic nosode Pasteurella Multocida Bacteria nosode 12X, 30X, 10M.  
    A number of pets have been tested positive to Pasteurella is a gram-negative bacteria.  Pasteurella multocida found in the mouths of approximately 75-80% of all cats. Cats with tartar build up and gingival disease have a higher rate of infection than cats with clean teeth. Symptoms are usually a swelling and local infection around the wound, which may lead to an abscess.

    Diagnosis of Egg Yolk Peritonitis in Birds During the consultation, let the veterinarian know what symptoms you have observed in your bird and when they started. If your bird has been seen by another veterinarian, it is recommended that you bring the previous medical records as this will help with the evaluation of your bird’s medical history. The veterinarian will then perform a physical exam and may suggest administering a small amount of gas anesthesia to the patient before starting; this gas anesthetic may help your bird to be less stressed. Weighing your bird, checking his eyes, beak, oral cavity, and plumage will be next, in addition to an abdominal palpation, vent and cloacal examination. The veterinarian may want to run some diagnostic tests. Patients with egg yolk peritonitis may have a higher white blood cell count (leukocytosis) and an increase in blood calcium, cholesterol and blood protein. An abdominal tap may reveal yolk or fat globules. The veterinarian may want to have a culture of the aspirated fluid.

    Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/bird/condition/egg-yolk-peritoniti
  • General Dosing and Instructions 
Guide

    For all species, size, and ages.

    HOMEOPATHIC MEDICINES

    (a) “HOMEOPATHICS”are sold in either a clear liquid or tiny white pills or granules – both have no odour or taste)

Easy “application dosing” for all species:

    • Homeopathic DROPS (clear liquid) DRIP or APPLY 3 to 4 drops, pat into fur/skin with bottom of bottle. i.e. back of shoulder blades (not orally) which is regarded as one dose for all size species and ages. Note: Liquid homeopathics are more suited for feline, toy dog, fish, birds and other small species
    • Homeopathic PILLS (white pills) crush a pill (or whole) and add to gum/pouch of mouth to dissolve in saliva. Does not need to swallow it.
    • Homeopathic GRANULES (white grain) and a small light sprinkle or a pinch to meals, or stir into water trough or bowl.
      Casual repeat dosing can add to water bowl or feed dish or water trough for wildlife or farm animals.

    Refer to Bottle Label for suggested frequencies repeat dosing needed per day.
    NOTE: 
 the rule is one must “repeat a dose” more frequently with less time in between each application dose, which is more important than the amount given each time. Repeat application will provide 

faster action.

    HERBAL MEDICINES

    (b) “HERBAL MEDICINES ” (brown liquid – strong odour & tasting) 
”Application dosing” for all species and sizes: 
Canine, equine, cow, sheep, goat : add herbal drops (as recommended on bottle label) to some (unsweetened apple sauce or apple juice) for canines and oral syringe side of mouth. Can add other vitamins (crushed) Alkaline green powders etc. to mix.

    Refer to Bottle Label for amount of drops per species size. e.g 60 drops = 1 teaspoon

    What I do for example: If I was needing to give herb treatments and/or vitamin supplements to feline or toy dog or other small animals – I add this herbal formula to a small bowl add some boiled water (about a teaspoon) to it so to dissolve the alcohol in it, let cool, then add what vitamins If needed (powder or crushed tab – a pinch) mixed in another 50ml of water, and oral syringe once a day or twice a day …smear on a little “vegemite paste” (if cannot get Vegemite in your country, try fresh pate or slippery elm powder added can help mask the taste) around and on tip of oral syringe, as felines seem to real like the taste of this paste, but not too much as it is quite a strong taste)

    NUTRITION

    (c)“NUTRITIONAL Mix 
” 
Giving vitamins and supplements (tablets or powders) Note: always crush tablet before adding to food or liquid mix.
Felines or small animals: make up 1 cup of mixture, adding approx. a pinch of some type of Green powder (alkaline powder) or Chlorella powder (cleansing of toxins) or 1/4 Teaspoons of Slippery elm powder (to mask the taste) with 1 teaspoon of herbs if you are having to also give herbal medicines (i.e. brown liquid) 
Med to large animals: add twice to three times the amount.

    DOSING: Feline or small animal: using an oral syringe draw up 1ml and gently small sips. Or add a teaspoon to meals if they don’t mind eating it with meals (mix well into food) Do not put in Fridge. Room temp is best as too cold is dislike by felines.
    DOSING: Canine, equine, cow, sheep, goat: try mixing well into food and hand piece before feeding main meals. Or dose same as suggested for felines, but add three times as much herbal medicines and vitamins to 1/2 cup of water or (unsweetened) apple sauce or apple juice.

    What I do for example: If i was needing to give herb treatments and/or vitamin supplements to feline or toy dog or other small animals – I add this herbal formula to 1/2 cup of boiled hot water to it so to dissolve the alcohol in it, let cool, then add what vitamins If needed (powder or crushed tab – a pinch) mixed in another 50ml of water, and oral syringe once a day or twice a day …. smear on a little “vegemite paste” (if cannot get Vegemite in your country, try fresh pate or slippery elm powder added can help mask the taste) around and on tip of oral syringe, as felines seem to real like the taste of this paste, but not too much as it is quite a strong taste)

    Slippery Elm Powder
 
If needing to add or use Slippery Elm powder

    FOR CONDITIONS like …. diarrhea, stomach ulcers, or sore inflamed mouth or mouth ulcers, constipation, or IBS (i.e. colitis), plus it can also been given as a liquid meal given orally via syringe as it is highly nutritional (oral liquid feeding) for convalescing during illness when not eating solids.

    CONVALESCING ..can been given as a liquid meal given orally via syringe as it is highly nutritional (oral liquid feeding) for convalescing during illness when not eating solids or not eating very well.
~ Add a small amount of powder to the mix to enough to make a runny liquid mix, if you put too much of the powder it will become thick and gluggy, if this happens you will need to add more liquid to it. Can add crushed vitamins and herbal medicines to this as well. OPTIONS: Oral dose in syringe or add to meals three times a day or more to maintain normal health again, then can stop or reduce frequencies.

  • We Ship Worldwide, every day

    Choice of either - Express or Regular Shipping:

    ~ Express Shipping Australia Wide (Courier Service)

    ~ International orders (Express Courier International-ECI).

    Allow 5-7 working days to most areas. (Remote areas will take longer time)
Express shipping orders are traceable.
    We ship internationally using Australia Post services. However, Australia Post do uses private contractors in certain countries apart from your own national courier. For example, in certain countries, the Express shipping might be carried by FedEx or UPS, even though we do not have any contract agreement with them.

    ~ Regular shipping
    We can only offer regular airmail shipping (with insurance) to selected countries. Not all countries accepts normal airmail to be insured thus not offering any traceable service. You will find this option when checking out your order.
    Please allow 10 – 14 working days for delivery. (Remote areas will take longer time)
    We cannot guarantee delivery via normal airmail nor within the time estimated above.

    For more information about shipping to your designated country, go to Australia Post Website at: http://auspost.com.au/apps/international-post-guide.html

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    Customer Reviews
    4.9 Based on 39 Reviews
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    Filter Reviews:
      02/24/2020
      I recommend this product

      Used on Hen with Egg Yolk Peritonitis

      I noticed one of our hens was unwell recently, off her food and was filling up with fluid, waddling and only excreting white liquid - all the classic signs of Egg Yolk Peritonitis. I only had a little Drawing Out and CRF Infection fighter left from a previous purchase but I started her on that while waiting for more Drawing Out and Infection Clear to arrive. I kept expecting the hen to die but she kept improving. She has improved even more so since starting on the Infection Clear, four days ago. Now she is back out running around the yard with the others, the fluid has disappeared, no more waddling and she is eating on her own without needing me to offer her food by hand. Excellent products.

      SH
      Suzanne H.
      Australia Australia
      02/12/2020
      I recommend this product

      Second purchase, very good result!

      This winter, I was able to get over my 17-year-old dog's bronchitis, and my flu was able to easily pass. It must be a must-have Remedy in the future.

      SK
      sunghee k.
      South Korea South Korea
      02/10/2020
      I recommend this product

      Infection clear AN070

      Everyone should have 1 bottle at home

      MK
      Marija K.
      Australia Australia
      01/13/2020
      I recommend this product

      Great Produce I will be looking at other products that you sell

      Fantastic product, no sign of infection after starting to use this. My dog was bitten badly by a maremma and he made a full recovery

      DA
      Dianne A.
      Australia Australia
      11/05/2019
      I recommend this product

      Scar gone

      I has a keloid on leg from surgery this was the only thing that got rid of it. I keep a bottle on hand at all times.

      J
      Jennifer
      United States United States